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SMART Book Blog for Teachers


WEEK #1


Pete the Cat, SCUBA Cat Author: James Dean

“I Can Read! My First Shared Reading”


This book was chosen because it has bubbles in it.


3 TYPES OF VOCABULARY IN THIS BOOK:

Vocabulary that is not explained in the text

  • SCUBA is an acronym for self-contained underwater breathing apparatus. An acronym is a word made from the first letter of each word in a phrase.

  • A seahorse is a fish. It is not a horse, even though the compound word includes “horse.”

  • A mane is hair on the back of the neck of a horse or around the head of a male lion.

  • Bubbles are round spheres filled with air. The outer edge is a membrane, a very thin layer of liquid. Bubbles can pop easily.

  • An eel is also a fish, even though it looks like a snake.

  • A jellyfish is not a fish, even though the word “fish” is part of its name. Fishes have bones inside, but jellyfish have no bones.

High-Frequency Words (sight words)

Up, up, up

Down, down, down


Fluency Phrases

School of fish

Shadow of a whale

What a surprise!

To the boat

What a cool adventure!


OUTDOOR ACTIVITY: Kids can make bubbles from the recipe.

Supplies: 1 cup measuring cups

Cleanup is very easy because this recipe includes soap. Kids will need to rinse their slippery hands with water. Use a plastic coat hanger for the bubble wand. The wand must fit into the pan. A dishpan is large enough with a kid-sized hanger.


RECIPE FOR BUBBLES

1 cup dishwashing liquid (Dawn)

1 cup bubble solution

1 gallon of water

Use a plastic coat hanger as a wand to make giant bubbles. Dip. Do not stir.

Do not pop bubbles unless you ask permission.


*Caution: Children can get soap in their eyes. It is not dangerous, but it stings.


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